Moving Subjects

Using a Ricoh GRD III and a Nikon DSLR to photograph streets, people, architecture and anything else that catches my eye.

Sunday, 11 January 2015

More Sideys

More Sideys...

Flemish bond brick wall with steel sign post.
Young lady in fashionable clothing walking from left to right.
Crisp sunny autumn day in London.
Ricoh GRD3.
B&W processing.




Flemish bond brick and concrete paving.
Young lady in fashionable (retro) clothing walking from right to left.
Cold winter day in London.
Ricoh GRD3.
B&W processing.



Glass block wall and block paving.
Lady in work clothing walking from left to right.
Eye contact.
Cold winter day in London.
Ricoh GRD3.
B&W processing.



Corrugated stainless steel kisok and concrete paving.
Lady in fashionable clothing walking from left to right.
Overcast day in London.
Ricoh GRD3.
B&W processing.


Flemish bond brick wall.
Young lady in retro cream dress walking from right to left.
Crisp sunny autumn day in London.
Ricoh GRD3.
Colour processing.


Saturday, 29 November 2014

The Sidey

I often find myself composing street shots in a particular way.  I have named these images 'sideys'. The following image is a prime example of a sidey....



My sideys follow a few simple rules:
  • A side profile of a person walking.
  • A man-made background 'canvas'.
  • The person positioned off centre (possibly using rule of thirds)
  • The person often of an interesting character (in my opinion, of course)
  • A 'mid stride' walking stance is preferred, although not essential.
  • The image must be level and plumb.
  • No ugly plastic carrier bags, people eating, general untidiness.

I usually select the background location first, then patiently wait until interesting passers by enter my viewfinder.  I have always been interested in architecture anyway, so I am always looking for aesthetic backdrops. 

Here are four more sideys which follow my rules. Three in my preferred black and white, and the last one in colour:






Sunday, 9 November 2014

From the hip


Here's some shots all with one thing in common...   They're all 'from the hip'. It's interesting how an everyday person about town can become quite imposing and larger than life, when the image taken from a lower angle.  The first two are both taken from around 2 metres, and I still don't really like to hold a camera in someones face as they walk by; so shooting from a lower angle is a good way to not draw attention to your actions. The results can be quite effective.